El Paso, TX
3/13 - 16

The drive from Van Horn to El Paso was about 110 miles so we arrived at the Mission RV park in El Paso around noon today. This gave us some time in the afternoon to visit Hueco Tanks state park. This is a fascinating area about 20 miles out of town that has a history of human habitation dating back about 8000 years all the way to when the Apaches used it as a hideout in the mid 1800's.


You may scan picture by depressing the left button while moving your cursor across the picture.

The main objective of the Hueco Tanks park is to preserve the archeology of the area. Unfortunately the defacing of the area started in the mid 1800's and continued through the early 1990's. This is a pictograph that dates back to around 1000 A.D. It is about 8 inches in diameter. This is much more stylish than the Anasasi pictographs we saw in Utah.

 

I took this picture for Matthew. The sheer walls and the porous nature of the rocks seem to be calling to all climbers in the area. It's a little difficult to see the climbers, so I included the red arrow to point out the climber on the pitch.


You may scan picture by depressing the left button while moving your cursor across the picture.


3/15 Today we ended up the the War Eagles Air Museum. The picture above is a pano of the museum. What a fantastic place. They had many WW2 and Korean conflict war planes restored to flying condition. They also had some period cars and private planes. We spent about two hours looking over the collection. Fortunately there was a very informative area about women in aviation which Susan enjoyed.

Some of my personal favorites are the P-51 Mustang on the left, which is undergoing restoration, and the F4 Corsair on the right. The F4 saw most of its action in the Pacific being flown from carriers by Marine pilots.

 

 




This is the P-38 Lightning. It is the only twin-engine fighter of the war.